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Alternate Member, State of Alaska, Royalty Policy Committee

Daniel “Dan” Saddler is an alternate member of the Department of Interior’s Royalty Policy Committee, and as a member of this committee advises Secretary Zinke “on policy and strategies to improve management of the multi-billion dollar, federal and American Indian mineral revenue program.”

Dan Saddler, who has a long history working in Alaska politics, describes himself as a “lifelong Republican and conservative, believing in limited government, strong national defense, individual liberty, and a loving God” and as being “pro-business, pro-family, pro-gun and pro-life.” Originally from Ohio, he got his bachelor’s degree from Miami University in 1983 and his master’s degree in journalism from Ohio State University in 1987. Saddler worked as a newspaper reporter in Ohio and later reported for the Anchorage Times, where he “covered military, resource development, [and] finance.” After reporting, Saddler worked in public relations for the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, which “provides energy services, petroleum refining and marketing, engineering and construction, technical services for government customers, and natural resource development.” Saddler was “legislative staff to four Alaska Republican lawmakers.” Next, Saddler worked in “communications for the [Alaska] department of natural resources” and “was deputy press secretary for Frank Murkowski.” He also worked in the administrations of Governors Sarah Palin and Sean Parnell. Saddler has served in the Alaska House of Representatives since 2011.

Sources:[Department of Interior, Press Release, 09/01/17, “Dan Saddler – House District 13 – Republican,” Alaska Division of Elections, 2016, “Representative Dan Saddler,” Alaska Legislature, accessed 09/29/17, “More about my family and me,” Dan Saddler, accessed 09/29/17, Sean Cockerham, “Dan Saddler running for Dahlstrom’s House seat,” Alaska Dispatch News, 04/29/16, and “Arctic Slope Regional Corporation,” Forbes, accessed 09/29/17]

Special Interests

Safari Club International (Resource Development on Public Lands)

According to his campaign website, Saddler is a member of Safari Club International, an organization that has ties to the oil and gas industry and that is "behind the killings of tens of thousands of animals, 'including those on the brink of extinction.'"

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Arctic Slope Regional Corporation (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Saddler worked for the Artic Slope Regional Corporation, a company that "provides energy services, petroleum refining and marketing, engineering and construction, technical services for government customers, and natural resource development."

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ConocoPhillips (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Saddler has taken in $2,500 from ConocoPhillips in campaign contributions; he took $1,000 in 2010, $500 in 2011, $500 in 2012, and $500 in 2016.

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Enstar Natural Gas (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Saddler has taken in $750 from Enstar Natural Gas in campaign contributions; he took $500 in 2010 and $250 in 2012.

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Alaska Miners Association (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Saddler has taken in $1,200 from the Alaska Miners Association in campaign contributions; he took $250 in 2012, $250 in 2013, $200 in 2014, and $500 in 2016.

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BP (Resource Development on Public Lands)

In 2016, Saddler took a $1,000 campaign contribution from multinational oil company BP.

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Political Connections

Dan Saddler has accepted at least $5,450 from extractive industries since 2010 when he was first elected to the Alaska House of Representatives.   

He has accepted contributions from ConocoPhillips, Enstar Natural Gas, the Alaska Miners Association, and BP, among others.

[“Show Me Contributions to Saddler, Dan,” National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed on 09/29/17]

Other Information

 

Dan Saddler sponsored an “‘unconstitutional'” bill that would “order the federal government to transfer upward of 166 million acres of federal lands to state ownership.”

Dan Saddler co-sponsored a bill that would “order the federal government to transfer upward of 166 million acres of federal lands to state ownership,” which state attorneys from the Alaska Division of Legal and Research Services said was “‘unconstitutional.'” The bill was “based on a similar measure in Utah, approved in 2012, demanding the handover of 30 million acres of federal land.” The original bill, “introduced by House Speaker Mike Chenault,” “said that all federal lands, excluding military property and some other classifications, must be turned over by Jan. 1, 2017, but an amended version advanced Monday by the House Finance Committee would allow the federal government to keep 53.8 million acres of national parks.” [Dermot Cole, “House leaders push land bill despite advice that it’s unconstitutional,” Alaska Dispatch News, 09/28/16]

Dan Saddler supports “oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.” He traveled to Washington D.C. with a group of state legislators to pitch opening “the refuge coastal plain to drilling” and “carried a resolution supporting drilling in ANWR before the National Conference of State Legislatures.”

Dan Saddler joined a group of Alaska “state representatives including House Speaker Mike Chenault” to travel “to Washington, D.C., and make a pitch — once again — for oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.” The group was invited by “Arctic Power, a private group with a Washington lobbying arm and state funds,” which “has been working since 1992 to open the refuge coastal plain to drilling.” According to Chenault, “Saddler was picked for the trip because he carried a resolution supporting drilling in ANWR before the National Conference of State Legislatures at its fall forum in Tampa, Fla.” [Lisa Demer, “Alaska lawmakers head for DC to lobby for ANWR drilling,” 09/29/16]

Dan Saddler believes that “Alaska’s economic well-being depends on maintaining our essential resource industries, progressing cautiously on a natural gas pipeline, cutting government to a more-affordable level, and making sure any new revenue is generated fairly and spent wisely.”

[“Dan Saddler – House District 13 – Republican,” Alaska Division of Elections, 2016]