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Alternate Member, Mineral/Energy Stakeholder, Royalty Policy Committee

Greg Morby is an alternate member of the Department of Interior’s Royalty Policy Committee, and as a member of this committee advises Secretary Zinke “on policy and strategies to improve management of the multi-billion dollar, federal and American Indian mineral revenue program.”

Greg Morby, who lives in Houston, graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1982 with a Bachelor’s degree in accounting. Morby was an Assistant Secretary at Texaco Incorporated from 1998 to 2002. (Texaco and Chevron merged in 2001, and Texaco now operates as a subsidiary of Chevron). Morby has worked at Chevron since 2003; he is currently Manager of Production Services.

Sources: [Department of Interior, Press Release, 09/01/17, LinkedIn Profile for Greg Morby, accessed 09/27/17, “AVS OFT Report,” New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, 01/10/17, George Raine, “The Chevron-Texaco Merger,” SFGate, 10/10/01, and “Company Overview of Texaco Inc.,” Bloomberg, accessed 09/27/17]

Special Interests

Texaco (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Before working at Chevron, Morby worked at Texaco. Texaco and Chevron merged in 2001, and Texaco now operates as a subsidiary of Chevron.

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Chevron (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Morby has worked at multinational energy corporation Chevron for at least 14 years.

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American Petroleum Institute (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Greg Morby worked at Chevron for at least 14 years, which is a member company of the American Petroleum Institute.

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New Mexico Tax Research Institute (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Morby is on the Board of the New Mexico Tax Research Institute (NMTRI), an organization that has received over $130,000 in funding from energy significant funding from energy companies companies and that has published reports favorable to the oil and gas industry.

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Background Information

Previous Employers

Texaco  

Chevron

Additional Background on Employers of Note:

In 2015, Greg Morby, on behalf of Chevron, objected to a proposed Interior rule “reconsidering whether Americans [were] receiving a ‘fair return’ on sales of coal, oil and natural gas taken from public lands.”

Greg Morby, working on behalf of Chevron, on May 8, 2015, wrote a letter to the Office of Natural Resources Revenue on its proposed “Consolidated Federal Oil & Gas and Federal & Indian Coal Valuation Reform” rule. The rule reconsidered “whether Americans [were] receiving a ‘fair return’ on sales of coal, oil and natural gas taken from public lands.”

[Greg Morby to Armand Southall, Office of Natural Resources Revenue, 05/08/15, and Tom Lutey, “Carbon copies: Elected officials pass coal industry letter off as their own,” Billings Gazette, 04/15/15]

Chevron opposed the proposed rule, because “ONRR [had] provide[d] insufficient reasons to put aside long-standing policy and regulations on which industry ha[d] relied for over a decade.” In particular, Chevron claimed that while they were “committed to ensure a fair return to the public on production of oil and gas from federal leases… a fair return must be balanced with the rights and legal obligations of the federal lessees.”

[Greg Morby to Armand Southall, Office of Natural Resources Revenue, 05/08/15]

Current Activity

Greg Morby supported the Trump administration’s repeal of the coal valuation rule, which closed “a loophole that enabled companies to dodge royalty payments when mining on taxpayer-owned public land.”

In May 2017, Greg Morby, on behalf of Chevron, submitted a letter to the Office of Natural Resources Revenue, writing, “Chevron supports the ONRR proposal to repeal the Consolidated Federal Oil & Gas and Federal & Indian Coal Valuation Reform Rule that was published in the Federal Register on July 1, 2016 (‘2017 Valuation Rule’).”

[Greg Morby to Armand Southall, Office of Natural Resources Revenue, 05/02/17]

“The valuation rule was proposed by former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell last year to close a loophole that enabled companies to dodge royalty payments when mining on taxpayer-owned public land. It required energy companies to pay royalties on sales to the first unaffiliated customer, known as an arm‘s-length sale, as the fuel moves to market.”

[Valerie Volcovici, “U.S. Interior Department rescinds coal valuation rule,” Reuters, 08/07/17]

Other Information

Greg Morby is on the Board of the New Mexico Tax Research Institute (NMTRI), an organization that has received significant funding from energy companies and has published reports favorable to the oil and gas industry.

Greg Morby is on the Board of Directors of the New Mexico Tax Research Institute (NMTRI).

[“Officers & Directors,” New Mexico Tax Research Institute, accessed 09/27/17]

On its website, NMTRI describes itself as “a nonprofit, nonpartisan, member-supported organization” that does “not advocate any agenda for or against taxation.”

[“About NMTRI,” New Mexico Tax Research Institute, accessed 09/18/17]

However, the New Mexico Tax Research Institute has received significant contributions from energy companies. In 2015 alone, the year most recent year for which its 990 form is available, NMTRI received $132,001 from energy companies, including: $15,000 from Chevron, $12,000 from Freeport McMoran, $10,000 from ConocoPhillips, $75,001 Occidental Petroleum Corp, $10,000 from Western Refining Inc., and $10,000 from Mack Energy Corporation.

[“New Mexico Tax Research Institute 990 Form,” ProPublica, accessed 09/19/17]

The New Mexico Tax Research Institute has conducted reports paid for by the New Mexico Oil & Gas Association. A report NMTRI released in 2014, partially funded by industry, found that “even counties where there is little oil and gas development have benefited from those industries.”

[“Report: New Mexico leans on oil, gas revenue,” Associated Press, 03/16/14]