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Primary Member, Academia and Public Interest Groups, Royalty Policy Committee

Roderick Eggert was named as a primary member of the Department of Interior’s Royalty Policy Committee, and as a member of this committee advises Secretary Zinke “on policy and strategies to improve management of the multi-billion dollar, federal and American Indian mineral revenue program.”

Roderick Eggert holds a B.A. in Earth Sciences from Dartmouth College, a M.S. in Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Pennsylvania State University, and a Ph.D. in Mineral Economics from the Pennsylvania State University. From 1982 to 1984 he was a research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, and from 1984 to 1985 was a Visiting Scholar in the Energy and Materials Division at Resources for the Future in Washington, D.C. From 1985 to 1986 he was a visiting Assistant Professor at the Pennsylvania State University. Since 1986, Eggert has taught at the Colorado School of Mines, and currently teaches economics and business there. Eggert’s “research and teaching have focused on various aspects of mineral economics and public policy, including the economics of mineral exploration, mineral demand, mining and the environment, microeconomics of mineral markets, and mining and sustainable development.” Since 2013, Eggert has also been the “Deputy Director of the Critical Materials Institute (CMI), an Energy Innovation Hub created… by the U.S. Department of Energy to accelerate innovation in energy materials.”

Sources: [Department of Interior, Press Release, 09/01/17, “Roderick G. Eggert,” Colorado School of Mines, 06/16, and “Roderick G. Eggert,” American Chemical Society, accessed 09/22/17, and “Roderick Eggert,” American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, accessed 09/22/17]

Special Interests

National Mining Association (Resource Development on Public Lands)

Eggert, in 2011, spoke at an event sponsored by the National Mining Association, an "influential coal-mining industry group" whose members include "more than 325 corporations involved in all aspects of the mining industry."

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Other Information

Roderick Eggert, in 2011, spoke at an event sponsored by the National Mining Association. During the event, he criticized the permitting process for mineral resources in the United States for being “slow” and “unpredictable.”

In June 2011, Roderick Eggert spoke on a panel at an event sponsored by the National Mining Association (NMA) on “Addressing America’s 21st Century Minerals Needs.” The National Mining Association is “an influential coal-mining industry group” whose members include “more than 325 corporations involved in all aspects of the mining industry including coal, metal and industrial mineral producers, mineral processors, equipment manufacturers, state associations, bulk transporters, engineering firms, consultants, [and] financial institutions.” [“Addressing America’s 21st Century Minerals Needs,” National Mining Association, 06/13/11, and Devin Henry, “Lobbying fight erupts over coal country bill,” The Hill, 06/26/17]

During the panel discussion, Roderick Eggert said that the “main impedimen[t] to the development of the full potential of minerals mining in the United States” was “‘the challenge of efficiently and appropriately balancing and weighing the commercial, environmental, and social dimensions of mineral development,'” specifically “regulatory approval.” He described the permitting process for mineral resources in the United States as “slow” and “unpredictable.” [“Addressing America’s 21st Century Minerals Needs,” National Mining Association, 06/13/11, and Manuel Quiñones, “Industry says U.S. falling behind,” Energy & Environment, 06/14/11]

Roderick Eggert has testified in support of the Critical Minerals Policy Act, legislation that has been described as “special-interest legislation” for the “critical minerals industry” and that some said did “too much to promote mining to the detriment of environmental reviews.” The Critical Minerals Policy Act was partially written by a Hill staffer who went to lobby for the National Mining Association after writing the bill.

Roderick Eggert, in January 2014, testified in support of S. 1600, “The Critical Minerals Policy Act,” legislation to “authorise spending up to $60 million for new studies of domestic mineral resources and research into recycling and substitutes,” and to fund “a review of the permitting process.” The bipartisan legislation, sponsored by Senators Lisa Murkowski and Ron Wyden, was supported by the “Semiconductor Industry Association, the Interstate Mining Compact Commission and the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.” [Manuel Quiñones, “Obama admin vague on, industry supportive of Murkowski bill,” Energy & Environment, 01/29/14, and and John Kemp, “COLUMN-Critical minerals and mining reform in the U.S.: Kemp,” Reuters, 01/31/14]

Critics have called the Critical Minerals Policy Act “special-interest legislation which deserved to die in Congress” because “it fail[ed] to identify a good reason for the critical minerals industry to receive special help from taxpayers.” Another “point of contention that… dogged the legislation for years” was whether it did “too much to promote mining to the detriment of environmental reviews.” [John Kemp, “COLUMN-Critical minerals and mining reform in the U.S.: Kemp,” Reuters, 01/31/14, and Manuel Quiñones, “Obama admin vague on, industry supportive of Murkowski bill,” Energy & Environment, 01/29/14]

Murkowski staffer Colin Hayes “helped write” S. 1600. Hayes has gone back and forth through the revolving door between government and industry; he worked for the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee from 2003 to December 2013, then took a year long stint to serve as “Executive Vice President” for “Energy Advocacy” at consulting firm McBee Strategic Consulting, where he lobbied on behalf the National Mining Association. Hayes returned to work for the committee in December 2014. [Manuel Quiñones, “MINING: Murkowski-Wyden minerals bill to get hearing,” Energy & Environment, 01/27/14, Legistorm Profile for Colin Hayes, accessed 09/24/17, and National Mining Association 2014 Second Quarter Report, United States Senate Lobbying Disclosure Act Database, accessed 09/24/17]

At a Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing in March 2017, Roderick Eggert “advocat[ed] for increased research funding to allow mining faculty to hire graduate students who can go on to work in the industry.”

[Dylan Brown, “MINING: Murkowski gears up to launch new critical minerals bill,” Energy & Environment, 03/29/17]

Roderick Eggert, in 2011, said “stockpiling rare earths and other critical materials” for “defense needs” “may be useful.”

[Manuel Quinones, “Industry and GOP lawmakers, citing shortage of rare earth materials, demand less red tape,” Energy & Environment, 05/25/11]